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Preserving Heritage: German Cooks are Positive Recipes Handed Down Through Generations Will Outlive Them

Stoll, Kasha. "Preserving Heritage: German Cooks are Positive Recipes Handed Down Through Generations Will Outlive Them." Tokepa Capital-Journal, 1 June 2005.


Cooks may come and go, but their recipes are timeless.

"My girls call me all the time and ask, 'How do you make ... ' " said Liz Dennis, one of the cooks for Germanfest 2005.

The two-day annual event is the main fundraiser for Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 333 N.E. Freeman. The church, which was founded in 1919, was initially established as a German parish, and many of its members relish their heritage and recipes that have been passed down for generations.

Although many of the parish cooks are nearing or have passed retirement age, they are confident that authentic, made-from-scratch German foods will be served for years to come.

"These ladies cooked for their families," said Norma Rogers, motioning with her hand towards several women standing in the parish kitchen. "Their (daughters) are grown now and they like it and want to know how to cook it for their families. And the boys always like to eat them."

Caption for photo - I will give you web page with image to use:

Anthony S. Bush/The Capital-Journal Lorine Haefner cranks out hand-made noodles for the Germanfest in the basement of Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 333 N.E. Freeman. The noodles then are set out to dry over-night.

Some of the more popular dishes, like krautstrudels, sauerbraten and German sausage, will be served at a full outdoor German buffet on Saturday and Sunday.

The cooks started their preparation for the event a week ago Monday when they made the noodles for grebble, a deep-fried dessert that is served with powdered sugar.

Their work will start in earnest today as they began making between 4,000 and 5,000 krautstrudels, or bierocks, an undisclosed number of sauerbraten and large quantities of hot German potato salad and cabbage slaw.

"Sauerbraten always seems to go fast," Dennis said. "No matter how much we increase it, the sauerbraten always seem to go."

Kasha Stoll can be reached at (785) 295-1270 or kasha.stoll@cjonline.com.

GERMANFEST

Saturday: 4 p.m.: Mass on school grounds, followed by a full German outdoor buffet and a snack bar and grill 7 to 11 p.m.: Outdoor dance

Sunday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Outdoor German buffet 1 to 3 p.m.: Bingo 3 p.m.: Auction begins

Recipe of the week

Krautstrudels
(Bierocks) 2 pounds ground beef
1/2 head cabbage, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 or 5 drops Tabasco sauce, optional
1 1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce, optional
Potato dough (recipe follows)

Potato Dough
1 package dry yeast
1 1/2 cups warm water
2/3 cup sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
2/3 cup vegetable shortening
2 eggs, beaten
1 cup mashed potatoes (may be instant)
7 to 7 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, divided

Dissolve yeast in water. Stir in sugar, salt, shortening, eggs and potatoes. Stir in four cups of flour, one cup at a time. Mix well until smooth. Knead with enough of the remaining flour to make a smooth dough. Place in greased bowl, turning dough to coat well. Cover tightly and refrigerate at least eight hours. Punch down. Shape into desired rolls.

Place on greased cookie sheet. Cover loosely and let rise until doubled in bulk.

Bake at 400 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes.

Chef's note: This dough can be used for dinner rolls or for cinnamon rolls.
Source: Sacred Heart Parish
Make potato dough.

Anthony S. Bush/The Capital-Journal From the left, Lorine Haefner, Liz Dennis, Virginia Engroff and Marcella Grace make noodles for Germanfest at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 333 N.E. Freeman. Click here to check for reprint availability. Combine meat, cabbage, onion and seasonings. Cook until meat is done.

Roll out potato dough as for cinnamon rolls and cut in 5-inch squares. (This needs to be fairly thin.) Place a tablespoon of meat mixture in center and pinch edges around it. Bake at 350 degrees until done, about 15 minutes.

Chef's note: Frozen bread dough may be substituted for the potato dough.
Yield: 24 strudels
Source: Sacred Heart Parish

Other recipes

The following recipes were submitted by members of the Sacred Heart Parish:

Potato Dough
1 package dry yeast
1 1/2 cups warm water
2/3 cup sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
2/3 cup vegetable shortening
2 eggs, beaten
1 cup mashed potatoes (may be instant)
7 to 7 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, divided

Dissolve yeast in water. Stir in sugar, salt, shortening, eggs and potatoes. Stir in four cups of flour, one cup at a time. Mix well until smooth. Knead with enough of the remaining flour to make a smooth dough. Place in greased bowl, turning dough to coat well. Cover tightly and refrigerate at least eight hours. Punch down. Shape into desired rolls.

Place on greased cookie sheet. Cover loosely and let rise until doubled in bulk.

Bake at 400 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes.

Chef's note: This dough can be used for dinner rolls or for cinnamon rolls.

German Sausage
3 pounds pork Boston butt (add 1 pound ground beef, if desired)
Seasoned salt
Salt
Pepper
Monosodium glutamate
Garlic salt
Onion salt

Coarse grind the meat. Season to taste with remaining ingredients. Soak natural hog casings in warm water one hour or until very soft and pliable for stuffing. Fill the casings with the seasoned meat mixture. Let set for a couple of hours before cooking.

Bake or fry for serving.

Grebble
8 egg yolks
1 cup sour cream
Flour

Blend egg yolks and sour cream. Add enough flour to make a stiff dough. Knead well and form into balls about the size of a walnut. Roll one ball at a time as thin as noodles. Cut slits through the middle.

Fry brown in deep fat. Remove and sprinkle with sugar.

Sauerbraten
4 pounds beef (chuck, rump or rolled roast)
2 teaspoons salt
1 medium onion, sliced
3 medium bay leaves
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 cup wine
1 cup water
1/4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons oil

Rub meat with salt. Put in crock or large non-metallic bowl with onions, bay leaves and pepper.

Heat wine and water together. Stir in sugar and pour over meat. Cover and refrigerate for three days, turning meat each day.

Remove meat from liquid, saving liquid for basting. Pat meat dry with paper towels. Brown meat on all sides in hot shortening. Place in roaster, add one cup of the marinating liquid, cover and cook in oven for three hours or until tender. Add marinating liquid as needed.

Hot German Potato Salad
1/2 pound bacon
1/2 cup celery, chopped
1/2 cup onion, sliced
1/4 cup bacon drippings
3 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon flour or cornstarch
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon celery seed
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/2 cup water
1/3 cup vinegar
5 medium potatoes, cooked and cubed

Cook bacon until crisp; drain and crumble. Sauté celery and onion in bacon drippings until tender. Combine sugar, flour and seasonings; stir into drippings. Add water and vinegar, stirring until smooth. Bring to a boil. Add potatoes and bacon. Mix thoroughly.

Cabbage Slaw
1 head cabbage
1 medium onion
3/4 cup sugar
3/4 cup salad oil
3/4 cup vinegar
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon mustard seed
1 teaspoon celery seed

Put in layers of cabbage and onion in crock or glass dish. Boil sugar, salad oil, vinegar, salt, mustard seed and celery seed. Pour boiling mixture over cabbage and onion. Refrigerate for 24 hours.
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Reprinted with permission of the Topeka Capital-Journal

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